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Dealing with a Rambunctious Puppy

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New puppies are adorable until they chew your new slippers and tear holes in the sofa. Fortunately, it is possible to calm down your rambunctious puppy with a few of the following tips:

A puppy can be a very fun addition to your household. They're great companions, teach kids responsibility, and generally add a lot of amusement and happiness to your family. But what if your little furry ball of energy has too much energy? While it can be great to think about romping around with your puppy after you get home from work, it's not as enjoyable to find that he has destroyed your living room while you were away.

There are a number of different ways to deal with puppies that have too much energy. The first is to try to tire them out. This method works well if you want to get your puppy to settle down before you go to bed at night or when you want some quiet time in the evening, but it's not as effective during the day if no one is home to give your puppy his workout.

What's the best way of tiring your puppy out? Well, there are a few methods. For starters, you can go for a long walk around the neighborhood. This is a good way to settle your puppy down and give him the exercise he needs. If you have kids, having them play catch or just run around the backyard with the puppy both work as well. Of course, this has the added benefit of tiring your children out as well which some parents find is a great bonus.

However, this also does nothing to help moderate your puppy's energy during the day. The following are a few different strategies for settling down your rambunctious puppy during the day so that your home remains intact when you return from work.

One option is to purchase a puppy crate and put your dog in it when you leave. Many people don't like this idea, since it keeps your puppy cooped up in a somewhat small area for eight hours or more at a time. However, many dogs will take to crate training quickly. You just have to make sure there's food and water in the crate, and some paper or other easily disposable material in the bottom of the crate for your puppy to go to the bathroom on. Another similar option is to shut the dog in a utility room or bathroom. However, while this gives your puppy a little more room, it's still important to provide food, water, and a place for the dog to relieve itself.

If you'd rather not crate your dog during the day, another option is finding a friend to puppy-sit. This alternative is especially nice if your friend doesn't work and has a puppy of his or her own. The two puppies will enjoy playing together during the day, and you'll know your puppy is getting exercise without destroying anything at home. If you can afford it, you could also look into doggy day car as an option for the time while you're away from your home.

Finally, you can always install a doggie door that allows you puppy to go in and out during the day at will. This allows him to run outside and play or use the bathroom when he needs to and come back inside to escape the heat or bad weather. However, you'll need to have a fenced in backyard for this to work and you may find yourself with an unwelcome animal visitor who has decided to avail himself of the doggie door.

No matter which option you choose, you'll soon find your rambunctious puppy calming down. In time, he'll lose some of that puppy energy and settle down into a well-trained, lovable dog.

 

 
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